Training Network: Wilderness Survival | Fitness Training  
Fitness Training
 

The Sport:

  • Orienteering History
  • Orienteering Overview
  • Course Setup
  • Officials
  • Start/Finish Areas
  • Course Safety
  • Control Point Guidelines
  • Map Symbols
  • Orienteering Techniques
  • Civilian Orienteering

    The Skills:

  • Maps
  • Marginal Information and Symbols
  • Grids
  • Scale and Distance
  • Direction
  • Overlays
  • Aerial Photographs
  • Navigation Equipment and Methods
  • Elevation and Relief
  • Terrain Association
  • Navigation in Different Types of Terrain

  • Field Sketching
  • Map Folding Techniques
  • Units of Measure and Conversion Factors

  • Intersection

    Intersection is the location of an unknown point by successively occupying at least two (preferably three) known positions on the ground and then map sighting on the unknown location. It is used to locate distant or inaccessible points or objects such as enemy targets and danger areas. There are two methods of intersection: the map and compass method and the straightedge method (Figures 6-16 and 6-17).

    Figure 6-16. Intersection, using map and compass.

    Figure 6-16. Intersection, using map and compass.

     

    Figure 6-17. Intersection, using a straightedge.

    Figure 6-17. Intersection, using a straightedge.

    a.   When using the map and compass method—

    (1)   Orient the map using the compass.

    (2)   Locate and mark your position on the map,

    (3)   Determine the magnetic azimuth to the unknown position using the compass.

    (4)   Convert the magnetic azimuth to grid azimuth.

    (5)   Draw a line on the map from your position on this grid azimuth.

    (6)   Move to a second known point and repeat steps 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

    (7)   The location of the unknown position is where the lines cross on the map. Determine the grid coordinates to the desired accuracy.

    b.   The straight edge method is used when a compass is not available. When using it—

    (1)   Orient the map on a flat surface by the terrain association method.

    (2)   Locate and mark your position on the map.

    (3)   Lay a straight edge on the map with one end at the userís position (A) as a pivot point; then, rotate the straightedge until the unkown point is sighted along the edge.

    (4)   Draw a line along the straight edge

    (5)   Repeat the above steps at position (B) and check for accuracy.

    (6)   The intersection of the lines on the map is the location of the unknown point (C). Determine the grid coordinates to the desired accuracy (Figure 6-17).

    Back to Direction

    Copyright © 2001-2005 Jalic LLC. All Rights Reserved.
    Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us